Wheat All About It

Episode 30: Rail’s future, rail’s past

7.18.17 Episode 30, In “Rail’s Future, Rail’s Past”, Scott Yates, director of communications and producer relations uses two segments to tell a story of railroads in the Inland Northwest. First, he talks with Keith Bailey, CEO of AgVentures, which manages both Reardan Grain Growers and Odessa Union Warehouse, about the benefits (and difficulties) of depending upon the 110 mile long CW short rail line that connects five country elevators with the new Highline Grain shuttle loading facility outside Cheney. Next up is a tour of the new Inland Northwest Rail Museum located just outside Reardan, with the president of the organization, Dale Swant.

By |July 18th, 2017|Comments Off on Episode 30: Rail’s future, rail’s past

Episode 29: Plotting Wheat’s Way Forward

7.11.17 Episode 29, In “Plotting Wheat’s Way Forward”, Scott Yates, director of communications and producer relations for the Washington Grain Commission, attends Washington State University’s Rearden Field Day where he talks to Ryan Higginbotham, director of the Cereal Variety Testing Program. But Yates leads off the episode with WSU spring wheat breeder Mike Pumphrey talking about his concerns that late June weather conditions set this year’s crop up for low falling numbers due to temperature fluctuations caused by Late Maturity Alpha Amylase activity.

By |July 11th, 2017|Comments Off on Episode 29: Plotting Wheat’s Way Forward

Episode 28: Demolishing Combines, Building Community

7.4.17 Episode 28, In "Demolishing Combines, Building Community”, Scott Yates, director of communications and producer relations for the Washington Grain Commission, makes a visit to the heart of dryland wheat country where the Lions Club of Lind, Washington hosted the 30th annual combine demolition derby June 9th and 10th. The fund raiser returns thousands of dollars to the community each year as it adds to the global happiness index.

By |July 4th, 2017|0 Comments

Episode 27: What’s that red in your eyes?

The difference between the current price for hard red spring wheat and the price for soft white, has sparked interest from farmers eyeing the extra $2 or more a bushel. In “What’s that red in your eyes?” Scott Yates, director of communications and producer relations for the Washington Grain Commission, looks at the challenges, opportunities and pitfalls of growing DNS, in conversations with farmers Eric Maier and Ron Jirava, WSU spring wheat breeder, Mike Pumphrey; WGC commissioner and seedsman Dana Herron and WGC CEO Glen Squires. Riley Hille, AgriPro account leader offers her assessment of two new varieties.

By |June 27th, 2017|Comments Off on Episode 27: What’s that red in your eyes?

Episode 26: Where We Are With Wireworms

Following the loss of the chemical Lindane in 2006, wireworms quickly became a destructive pest of Eastern Washington wheat farmers. Fast forward to 2017 and the larval form of the click beetle appears to be coming under control. What happened? Thanks to Washington Grain Commission funding, research to investigate wireworms was launched and much more is now known about their control. Join the conversation Scott Yates, director of communications and producer relations at the Washington Grain Commission enjoyed with Aaron Esser, WSU Extension regional agronomist for wheat production, as he explains the status of research and control of the pesky wireworm.

By |June 20th, 2017|Comments Off on Episode 26: Where We Are With Wireworms

Episode 25: The Other Weatherman

You’ve attended the long range forecasts of the man known as “The Weatherman”—Art Douglas—for decades. Now listen to “The Other Weatherman”. Jeremy Wolf is a meteorologist at the National Weather Service located outside Spokane in Airway Heights. He sat down with Scott Yates, director of communications and producer relations for the Washington Grain Commission, to discuss the reasons behind last winter and spring’s abundance of moisture. Hint: it all started southwest of the Hawaiian islands.

By |June 13th, 2017|0 Comments

Episode 24: Through Wheat Colored Glasses

In “Through Wheat Colored Glasses”, Scott Yates, director of communications and producer relations for the Washington Grain Commission, illustrates how the Wheat All About It! podcast has increased visits to the WGC website and connected with a new cadre of smartphone listeners. Yates also reveals some secrets about the podcast, while using the opportunity to hammer home the importance of wheat in the world. And don’t miss the excerpt from the book, Sapiens, which proposes that it wasn’t early humans who manipulated wheat, but rather, wheat that manipulated early humans!

By |June 6th, 2017|Comments Off on Episode 24: Through Wheat Colored Glasses

Episode 23: Shepherding a Grain Connection

In “Shepherding a Grain Connection,” Scott Yates, director of communications and producer relations talks with farmer and seedsman Fred Fleming as well as other individuals associated with Shepherd’s Grain, a flour company that originated in Eastern Washington and touts soil, farm and farmer sustainable in addition to a traceability. Listen to a millennial explain why knowing where food comes from is so important to her generation.

By |May 30th, 2017|0 Comments

Episode 22: The Commission’s Business

In the first segment of “The Commission’s Business”, commissioners of the Washington Grain Commission discuss their observations of the current winter wheat crop and its potential for delivering a well above average harvest against the backdrop of poor prices. The second segment addresses the creation of the WGC’s 2017/2018 budget including how the WGC is tackling the falling numbers issue and the use of reserve funds to cover budget shortfalls.

By |May 23rd, 2017|Comments Off on Episode 22: The Commission’s Business

Episode 21: There’s Nothing Basic About It!

In “There’s Nothing Basic About It!”, Michael Neff, Washington State University professor of crop biotechnology, and Scott Yates, director of communications and producer relations with the Washington Grain Commission, discuss the need to continue to make basic research a priority. Neff makes clear that Crispr Cas 9, the gene editing technique he describes as a game changer with the potential to revolutionize plant breeding, grew out of simple scientific curiosity.

By |May 16th, 2017|Comments Off on Episode 21: There’s Nothing Basic About It!